Olympus Technical Services took delivery of two 18,000-gallon open-top frac tanks at our headquarters in Helena this past week. Frac tanks are large, mobile steel tanks for storing liquids. They were originally created for use in the hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking” industry, which is how they got their name, but there are many uses for the tanks beyond the oil and gas industry.

In environmental remediation, frac tanks provide safe and leak-proof temporary storage for contaminated water. The tanks have a fixed rear axle so they can be positioned near an impacted site using a tractor or a truck. The open top and built-in catwalk make it easy to monitor the level of the contents. The open top also makes cleaning easier. Frac tanks can be coupled to pumps, filters, and other equipment so treatment of pollutants can happen on-site through a pump-and-treat or air sparge system.

Olympus has used frac tanks in the past to dewater excavations. If we encounter groundwater while removing contaminated soil, that groundwater is often contaminated too and should be remediated to minimize the potential impact to supplies of drinking water in the area. Olympus has also used frac tanks on emergency response projects that required temporary storage of liquids.

While frac tanks are plentiful in the Bakken oil fields of Northeast Montana and North Dakota, they aren’t readily available in Western Montana or Idaho, so we have had to rent them from far-flung locations, usually Salt Lake City. Owning our own frac tanks enhances our capabilities on emergency response calls. It also reduces our mobilization costs, which will result in cost savings for our customers as well.

These frac tanks won’t be sitting in our equipment lot for long. They are already scheduled to be used on a project in Kalispell that begins later this week.

For more information on impacted or non-impacted groundwater dewatering, pump-and-treat services, or to inquire about frac tank rental please call 406-443-3087 in Western Montana, 406-245-3554 in Eastern Montana, and 208-562-5500 in Idaho.